The Signal Chief

Screwing Around with IPTables When It Doesn’t Play Nice

So you may not have noticed (hopefully) but I recently moved signal-chief from a shared hosting instance on GoDaddy to a dedicated VPS system. As a cyber guy, one of the first things I wanted to do was to start with some basic security so of course step one is to run yum update to update all of my packages, and step two was to setup some firewall rules. To allow me to initial a connection (DNS, http, whatever) from the server and get the return traffic back. Unfortunately when I tried to run this command I got “iptables: No chain/target/match by that name” sent back to me. Well that’s frustrating.

Translating Geek to Geek

Imagine this scenario…. “The first neutron passes the LD and engages enemy position.  The enemy position is destroyed and the damage is extensive enough to cause an adjoining position to catch fire.  When the ammunition in that adjoining position explodes it takes out another position…” Huh?

Where the Hell am I?

As anyone who has spent more than an hour or two driving around the box at NTC knows, it can be pretty damn easy to get lost in the desert, especially at night under blackout conditions.  After 3.5 years there, I got pretty good at knowing my way around the box but during each rotation there was always at least one or two times where I would get turned around and have no idea where the hell I was

I Know Nothing….and am proud of it.

I was looking through Nixcraft on Facebook yesterday (if you haven’t been to it before, check it out) and came across the graph. As a warrant officer, we’re supposed to be experts in whatever field it is that we happen to be in.  But what exactly does that mean?

Logs Logs Logs

One thing that I first noticed occasionally as a Net Tech, and then more as an OC/T at NTC and finally a ton now that I have moved into the cyber side of the world is the just how important logs can be. The problem….we suck at actually saving the stupid things.

More Than Button Pushing

The quality of our training will determine our mission success. Shortcuts during training can have negative long-term effects on our mission readiness. This article is intended to pick up where The Lost Art of Training left off. If you haven’t read it yet, I would suggest you start there.

The Shifting Sands of Technology

Technical competence is the foundation on which our profession is built. We are in a constant race to maintain a relevant set of skills. Technology is continuously changing and evolving like shifting sand under our feet. If we fail to learn and adapt, we will be left behind.

Getting from A to Z Part 2 (Troubleshooting Layer 3)

By and large I personally think that most of us are much more comfortable with layer three than any other layer in the OSI model. We deal with it each and every day. We have a number of tools at our disposal which make it very easy for us to see if/when it’s working and just how the data is traveling. To start with though, we have to know just how things are supposed to work.